Tag Archives: IRA

Saving Through the Ages

Guest post by Contributing Editor, Matthew Amster-Burton, Mint.com.

Saving through the agesReputable financial advisors, websites and your mom say to save for retirement, college, a down payment for a home and emergencies.

  • A typical response might be, “Yeah, but how much?” and “When?”

Libraries of books have been written on this subject. The implication is that determining your proper savings rate involves solving differential equations, brushing up on Excel functions, and reading the entire US tax code. If you’re not ready to do that, just turn everything over to an expert. Right? Not really.

Let’s talk about three things that may get in the way of people saving—and then set those obstacles aside and make it easy to do on your own, no matter your age or stage of life.

  • It’s hard. Perhaps you don’t make enough money to save aggressively or it’s psychologically difficult to set aside money instead of spending it. For most of us, it’s a combination.
  • 401(k). IRA. Roth IRA. 529 college savings plan. Savings account. Savings bonds. Why do we have so many boxes to put our money in? In three letters: the IRS. The government encourages us to save by giving us a tax break when we do.  Unfortunately, we now have so many savings vehicles to choose from that the easiest option is to just say, “I’ll think about it next month.” And we haven’t even talked about investment options yet!
  • Nobody knows the future. What if I save for college and my kid has other plans?  What if I max out my 401(k) and then need the money before I retire? Again, the easiest response is, “I’ll figure this out later.”

Pick a number

But here’s one thing to realize: choosing the wrong type of account or making a wrong guess about the future is a small mistake. Failing to save anything is a big mistake. Here are a few rules of thumb when it comes to saving through the ages.

  • If you’re young, save 25%. That’s 25% of your gross pay, before taxes. You can count debt repayment as savings, and repaying student loans should be a priority. The rest of the money can go toward a down payment fund, college fund, and retirement savings.
  • If you have kids in college, you probably can’t afford to save unless you’re exceptionally wealthy. Get your 401(k) match, avoid parent loans, and send the rest of your money to the bursar’s office.
  • If you’re 50 to 65, save 30% or more. This is the age when most people do most of their retirement savings. Tuition bills are a bad memory. The kids are out of the house. You can downsize. Plenty of families squander this opportunity. But not you, right?

These numbers are probably higher than you’ve seen elsewhere. That’s because they’re not designed for the best-case scenario. They’re designed with enough of a cushion that if everything goes right, you’ll end up with even more money that you’ll need for retirement.

Matthew Amster-Burton is a personal finance columnist at Mint.com. Find him on Twitter @Mint_Mamster.

Disclosure:

The views set forth in this blog are the opinions of the author alone and may not represent the views of any firm or entity with whom he is affiliated. The data, information, and content on this blog are for information, education, and non-commercial purposes only. The information on this blog does not involve the rendering of personalized investment advice and is limited to the dissemination of opinions on investing. No reader should construe these opinions as an offer of advisory services. Mint.com is not affiliated with FOLIOfn or The Portfolioist.

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Saving and Investing for Retirement: Part One

We Are In Trouble: Part One of Our Special Five Part Series

As the presidential election season of 2012 has gotten underway, there is a massive issue that has gotten very little attention: how Americans will sustain themselves in retirement.  In 2010, there were 40 million Americans over the age of 65.  By 2030, that number is expected to rise to 70 million, which represents 20% of the total population.  At the same time, we have moved from a workforce with traditional pensions to one in which each person chooses how much to save and how to invest that money.

Only 42% of American private-sector workers between ages 25 and 64 have any type of retirement plan in their current job. The majority of Americans (67%) who have access to a pension plan have only self-directed accounts such as 401(k)’s and similar accounts (such as 457(b) plans which cover those who work at non-profits or who are employed by the state or local government organizations).  A large number of Americans also have IRAs.  We refer to these types of retirement plans as Defined Contribution (DC) plans as opposed to Defined Benefit (DB) plans, the traditional pensions that used to be the norm. Continue reading

401(k)s for the Self-Employed

Guest post by Contributing Editor, Matthew Amster-Burton, Mint.com.

Every once in a while, I receive a stack of paper in the mail from Vanguard addressed to “Plan Administrator,” which gives me an undeserved sense of self-importance.

No, I didn’t select “Plan Administrator” from a drop-down list of salutations that also included “Dr.,” “Lord,” and “Marquis”; I am actually the administrator of a 401(k) plan. The plan has one participant. Guess who? Continue reading

What is Your Pension Really Worth?

Last week, we posted an article from Michael Lewitt, Vice President and Portfolio Manager at Cumberland Advisors called “The Pension Dilemma” that talked about how America’s largest pension fund, the California Public Employees Retirement Systems (CALPERS) reported an abysmal 1% return on its investments for the past year (ending June 30, 2012).

CALPERS has been in the news lately for several reasons:

  1. The California state pension is a bellwether for other state-run retirement systems across the U.S. that are also forced to face one of the most challenging periods in history: low interest rates, volatile markets and slow economic growth.
  2. CALPERS missed their own internal targets by more than 7.2% and then blamed their underperformance partly on picks made by individual investment managers (which CALPERS declined to name).
  3. The CALPERS underperformance has shaken the confidence that many investors have in their own pension funds.

What Does This Means for the Average Investor?

Retirement planning is a passion for us here at the Portfolioist. Yes, go ahead and laugh at the use of the word “passion” if you must—but that’s how we truly feel—especially in these turbulent economic times. Continue reading