Tag Archives: Jack Bogle

Carl Richards on Conquering Investing Mistakes and Learning to Talk About Money

Carl Richards has a few thoughts on how we might get around some of our own bad money habits, and he shared them in the video discussion below. A student of behavioral finance, Richards combines that interest with the practical experience of working as a financial advisor in Park City, Utah, where he sees plenty of these concepts playing themselves out in all the wrong ways in his work at Prasada Capital Management. Continue reading

The Challenge of Diversified Investing in a Correlated World

Below is a Fidelity Investments heat map showing the investing terrain of the past year, particularly how correlated a variety of investment classes were to the S&P 500 Index over the 12 months ended August 2010. As has been much discussed, many investment classes have moved in close tandem to this US Stock index. It is a small world after all.

But for those defending the importance of a continued commitment to bonds despite the low yields (Jack Bogle, Bill Bernstein, and Fidelity itself, among them) this map provides much support. Investment grade bonds and 30 day T-bills are the truest counterweight to all equities in every region of the world. Precious metals in general, gold in particular, the Yen, agriculture and livestock provided balance too.

The graphic comes from Intelligent Speculator, who notes surprise at the BRIC and Emerging Market’s similarly close correlation to the US market, and also predicts a more valuable role for real estate moving forward.

(Please click on image to enlarge.) Comments, insights, questions welcome below.

Jack Bogle’s Growth Outlook for Stocks and Bonds

Vanguard founder and investing icon John Bogle doesn’t believe we’re in a bond bubble, but he does think bonds will produce only modest returns for quite some time. Still he says investors generally belong in the conventional stock and bond markets — not reaching into more exotic categories for yield.

In this interview (video below) with Morningstar at the recently concluded Bogleheads reunion outside Philadelphia, he runs through a common sense approach to estimating what kind of yields investors can expect over the next five to ten years from those conventional categories. Continue reading