Tag Archives: long-term investing

Different Perspectives on Home Ownership

The question of whether to buy or rent a home is of enormous economic significance for most families. Home equity represents the vast majority of American families’ net worth (see chart below). In a post in mid-2011, I discussed some of the major economic variables in the decision to buy a home. My conclusion was that buying a home made sense, but not because housing generates attractive long-term investment gains. The long-term data suggests houses have historically increased in value at a rate only slightly higher than inflation. The best arguments for owning a home, I argued, were historically-low interest rates, the mortgage interest tax deduction, and the inflation hedge provided by locking in your costs for shelter for the long-term. Since that time, housing prices and rents have risen dramatically. In the past week I read two thoughtful and interesting articles on the economics of owning a home that motivated me to revisit this topic for 2014.

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Is Your Home Still A Good Investment?

Dr. Robert Shiller, the renowned Yale professor and creator of the S&P Case-Shiller Housing Index, recently made several dire announcements about the short-term and long-term prospects for the housing market. Asked for his prediction on housing prices in a recent interview, Dr. Shiller reported that prices might fall another 10% to 25% in the next few years. (Shiller also acknowledges that forecasting the direction of the housing market is as hard as predicting the weather and that we are in uncharted territory on a range of fronts.)

The Housing Market: A History of Poor Performance

Let’s set aside the short-term housing predictions and focus on long-term issues.

Dr. Shiller analyzed the financial benefits of home ownership from an investor’s point of view. His research found that housing prices did not outperform Continue reading

Do Performance Claims Really Add Up?

Jason Zweig, well-known author of “The Intelligent Investor” column at The Wall Street Journal, recently checked out the claims of market-beating performance in marketing materials from a range of market commentators.

For example, Jim Cramer’s newsletter was reported by Zweig as stating that his stock picks generated returns more than twice the performance of the S&P 500 Index from Jan 1, 2002 to April 1, 2011. Over this period, the newsletter described Mr. Cramer’s performance as generating 39.2% vs.15.5% for the S&P 500.

Mr. Zweig noticed, however, that in Mr. Cramer’s performance comparison, the returns cited for his stock picks included dividends, while the returns cited for the S&P 500 Index (over the same period) did not. Continue reading